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London's latest fatberg - a congealed, rock-hard mass of fat, grease, wet wipes, used diapers, condoms and more - clocks in at 130 tons, and it's more than 800 feet long, according to the BBC.

"It's basically like trying to break up concrete", Mr Rimmer said. Thames Water who are in charge of unblocking it say it's one of the biggest they've ever seen.

Work on the disgusting mass, which is below the streets of London's historic Whitechapel area, started this week.

The so-called "fatberg" weighs 130 tonnes, and is now clogging a 250-metre stretch of piping underneath Whitechapel, east London.

Keep calm and carry on: A utilities worker suits up in preparation for some rather uncomfortable sewer work. The crews are removing 20 to 30 tonnes a day, working 8am to 5pm, seven days a week, removing the matter for disposal at a recycling site in Stratford.

Previous year crews used a crane to remove a seven-metre "snake" of mainly wet wipes, weighing about 750 kilograms, from a sewer under Newcastle, while another 300 kilograms were removed by crew members using buckets.

Thames Water officials said Tuesday it is likely to take three weeks to dissolve the outsized fatberg.

Inspections by CCTV showed that the sewer, which is 47 inches high and 27.6 inches wide is blocked by the fatberg.

Rimmer added: "We check our sewers routinely but these things can build up really quickly and cause big problems with flooding, as the waste gets blocked".

Since 2015, Thames Water has been supplying low-carbon energy company 2OC with fats and oils retrieved from London's sewers.

"When it comes to preventing fatbergs, everyone has a role to play", said Rimmer.

Among the most common causes of drain blockages are make-up and nappy wipes, fat and grease, chewing gum, dental floss, plasters and building debris. "The sewers are not an abyss for household rubbish and our message to everyone is clear - please 'Bin it - don't block it'".

The company will send eight workers to break up the fatberg, which weighs the same as 11 double-decker buses.


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