Today's announcement includes both a 20 qubit processor ready for use by its IBM Q clients and an operational 50 qubit prototype now in development. The 20-qubit processor will power IBM Q when it becomes available by the end of 2017, while the more powerful 50-qubit chip is expected to be integrated with the quantum platform sometime next year. Companies like Google and Intel are now developing quantum computers, and industry stalwart IBM just announced today that it has produced a machine that is able to process 50 quantum bits (qubits).

IBM has been offering quantum computing as a cloud service since past year when it came out with a 5 qubit version of the advanced computers.

"We are really proud of this; it's a big frickin' deal", Dario Gil, who directs AI and quantum computing at IBM, told MIT Technology Review.

IBM on Friday announced a significant upgrade for clients using its quantum computing-based cloud services. "These latest advances show that we are quickly making quantum systems and tools available that could offer an advantage for tackling problems outside the realm of classical machines".

GOOGLE HAS teamed up with entirely honest German vehicle maker Volkswagen to explore ways in which Google's quantum computing technology can be applied in the automotive sector.

I continue to be amazed and inspired by the ecosystem we have built over the past year and a half, and I believe there is much more we will do through the development of QISKit, the quantum information software development kit. In other words, the time is increasingly ripe for quantum systems to be granted more legitimacy as accelerators for HPC applications or as wholesale replacements in very select areas like quantum chemistry, for instance. This form of open access and open research is critical for accelerated learning and implementation of quantum computing. A year later, we added a second device with 16 qubits. He says that IBM wants to push a new metric for quantum computing capability measurement. But Google has a 49-qubit processor in the works that may be the first quantum computer to out-perform a classical computer at the same task. As this toolkit improves, both through our own contributions, and those of the open-source community, our rate of scientific and technical progress as a community will grow alongside it.

"I use the IBM Q experience and QISKit as an integral part of my classroom teaching on quantum computing, and I can not emphasize enough how important it is". Today's quantum machines are in the 90 microsecond range. He says that IBM researchers have managed to achieve the higher qubit number with low error rates, making them highly useful to researchers. We are taking a universal path that can scale toward some eventual fault tolerant quantum system. As well, IBM has industrial partners exploring practical quantum applications through the IBM Research Frontiers Institute, a consortium that develops and shares a portfolio of ground-breaking computing technologies and evaluates their business implications.


COMMENTS