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In this court room drawing, U.S. Marshals escort defendant Akayed Ullah, center, into court for his arraignment on charges that include providing material support to a terrorist organization and using a weapon of mass destruction, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018 in NY.

Defense lawyer Amy Gallicchio said Ullah, who is now held at the Metropolitan Correctional Center federal jail in Manhattan, needed medical attention for painful stitches that were "embedded" in his skin and for a medical dressing that hadn't been changed recently.

Reportedly inspired by ISIS, Ullah allegedly set off the "effectively low-tech device", but the blast wasn't powerful enough to turn the pipe into deadly shrapnel, law enforcement said in December.

A Bangladeshi immigrant was indicted Wednesday in the failed pipe bombing of the NY subway system last month.

Federal authorities on Wednesday released a six-count indictment charging Ullah with providing material support to the Islamic State, use of a weapon of mass destruction, bombing a public transport system, committing a terrorist attack against a mass transport system, destruction of public property with an explosive and using a destructive device in a crime of violence. He answered, "Yes." When asked for his plea, Ullah responded, "At this moment, not guilty".

Akayed Ullah, a 27-year-old Bangladeshi man, faces a litany of charges in the December 11 bombing in an underground walkway connecting two subway lines beneath the Port Authority Bus terminal.

She said Ullah recently had some stitches removed but had others that were still causing him a "great deal of discomfort".

Ullah suffered burns and other wounds; no one else was seriously injured.

"We have an indictment containing charges like this, I think that it's easy to lose sight of the very important and invaluable rights that every person is afforded in our system of justice, including Mr. Ullah", Gallicchio said.

Since then US President Donald Trump has been pushing for end to chain migration and diversity lottery visa. The president later demanded tightened immigration rules.

Prosecutors said that Ullah, who has lived in the United States since 2011, began his self-radicalisation in 2014 when he started viewing pro-Islamic State materials online.


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