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On Friday, the state Public Service Commission began the process of revoking its approval for the Charter-Time Warner Cable merger. "After more than a year of administrative enforcement efforts to bring Charter into compliance with the Commission's merger order, the time has come for stronger actions to protect New Yorkers and the public interest".

"These recurring failures led the Commission to the broader conclusion that the company was not interested in being a good corporate citizen and that the Commission could no longer in good faith and conscience allow it to operate in NY", the PSC said in its announcement.

The Public Service Commission had previously fined Charter $2 million for failing to meet the broadband deadlines and voted Friday to force the company to forfeit $1 million in credit that was approved as part of the merger. But when it provided its next update in December, commission officials said Charter did not deserve credit for more than 18,000 households it said it had connected, in part because many of them appeared to be located in New York City and not a hard-to-reach, less densely populated area. Spectrum vowed to fight the ruling.

"In the weeks leading up to an election, rhetoric often becomes politically charged", the company said in a statement.

Today in a move many didn't think would happen NY ordered Chater to leave the state. In order to get its deal approved, Charter had promised to make broadband available to an additional 145,000 homes and businesses in the state's rural communities within four years of when the deal closed.

NY announced Friday that Charter Communications, Inc., doing business as Spectrum, is no longer permitted to serve customers in the state. NY will not tolerate Charter's gaslighting its own customers into believing it is meeting its promises. New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (D) has not shied away from criticizing Charter for its delays; in May, he foreshadowed regulators' decision by saying the public service commission had initiated "legal action" against the company. They have 60 days to file a plan to ensure a new transition to another provider.

These recurring failures led the Commission to the broader conclusion that the company was not interested in being a good corporate citizen and that the Commission could no longer in good faith and conscience allow it to operate in NY. We'll see how Charter responds and what actually comes of this, but with more than 2 million subscribers to Charter in NY, it's going to have a major impact on the television and internet landscape there.


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