KXIP vs KKR Live Score

One of the best shooting-star shows of the year (at least in the northern hemisphere) is upon us again with the arrival of the Perseid meteor shower. People can look directly overhead to see the meteors, as long as they are in a dark area without too much light pollution.

So if you're lucky enough to have a chance of catching the Perseid meteor shower, it sounds like you'll be in for a spectacular night of skywatching.

The annual Perseid meteor shower happens when the Earth sweeps through dust that's left behind by a comet swift-tunnel, according to University of Manitoba instructor Danielle Pahud.

"Comets are spectacular and handsome and take months to go across the sky but every time they go near the sun they are melted down a little bit".

The showers are named after the constellation Perseus because the direction from which they come in the sky lies in the same radiant as Perseus. That's fewer than the 150-200 meteors per hour that can be seen in years when the shower is in outburst, but will likely still make for quite the show.

Since the Perseids always show up in August, they often coincide with warm summer nights - ideal weather for viewing if you can avoid rain or clouds and get to a dark spot.

Cooke recommends steering clear of bright city lights in order to get the best view.

All you'll really need to do is crane your head upwards. Meteors can appear anywhere in the sky so try and find an open area, away from street lights. The Slooh observatory will host a livestream of the shower starting at 5 p.m. ET on Sunday.

"The dunes at Mleiha, especially around Al Faya Mountain and The Fossil Rock, offer a secluded experience for visitors and sky watchers who look forward to create great memories out of this opportunity". The Earth will pass through the densest part of the comet's trail on August 12th, meaning more meteors will be present during this event.

The meteor shower will reach its peak on the nights of August 11 and 12, and the show will get underway around midnight local time.

As the particles, ranging in size from a grain of sand to a pea, hit the Earth's atmosphere at 37 miles per second, they burn up and streak across the sky.

In addition to the Perseids, there will also be four planets visible in the sky on the nights of the shower's peak.


COMMENTS